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Education

Education, schools, and learning

classroom desks
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Got some free time this weekend? Check out these 5 education stories you may have missed this week:

1. Applying for college aid just got harder NPR

Jennifer Guerra / Michigan Radio

The state says 38 schools with persistently low test scores might not have to close by the end of the year. At least, not yet. These schools now have 60 days to come up with a turnaround plan using what the state calls a "partnership" model. We wanted to know a little bit more about what that partnership strategy might entail, so we took a trip to Dearborn to find out. 

person holding phone
CAFNR / Flickr CC / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Research shows when parents are involved and engaged in their kids' education, it improves student achievement. Students earn higher grades and test scores, show improved behavior and miss fewer school days.

But with both kids and parents having increasingly busy lives, getting involved can be easier said than done

graduation cap
Amanda Mar / Flickr / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

President Donald Trump signed an executive order Tuesday moving the Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities from the Department of Education to the executive office of the White House - a move aimed at possibly sending more funding to HBCUs in the future.

woman in cap and gown
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Earning a college degree can create a pathway to a better job, higher wages and overall improved quality of life. Studies show that college graduates earn significantly more money throughout their lifetime people with just a high school degree.

Early Childhood Classroom
Charlie Vinz / Flickr CC / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

Latino students are, on average, approximately three months behind their white peers in math when they start kindergarten, according to a recent report from the Child Trends Hispanic Institute.

For the report, "Making Math Count More for Young Latino Children," researchers reviewed existing research and analyzed data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study.

A picture of Law Elementary, one of 38 schools in Michigan slated for possible closure.
Jennifer Guerra / Michigan Radio

You may have heard that the state is planning to close as many as 38 schools by this summer, the bulk of which are in Detroit. That’s a big deal for a whole lot of families, and so far, the state isn’t giving them much guidance about what to do. So let’s walk through where things stand.

boy doing homework
PacificLegalFoundation / Flickr CC / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

There are more than 1.3 million homeless students in the United States - a number that has nearly doubled in the last decade.

report card for school
Michigan Department of Education

There’s a new blueprint for the future of school accountability in Michigan.  

The state’s Department of Education on Tuesday unveiled its draft plan for the implementation of the federal Every Student Succeeds Act (or ESSA). 

Stack of money
Pictures of Money / Flickr CC / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

State funding for higher education in the U.S. is showing continued growth overall. That's according to the results of the latest Grapevine survey, an annual compilation of data on state fiscal support for higher education.

State funding rose by 3.4% across the U.S. from the 2015-16 to 2016-17 fiscal years. James Palmer is a professor of higher education at Illinois State University and Grapevine Editor.

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