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Education

Education, schools, and learning

kid holding lunch tray
Tim Lauer / Flickr CC / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

In the past few years, you may have heard the term "lunch shaming" being thrown around. It's basically the practice of penalizing students who don't have money to pay for their school lunch.

Lunch shaming has been the focus of recent news stories about cafeteria workers who have either quit their jobs because they refused to deny students hot lunches or were fired for giving free food to students who couldn't pay.

Jennifer Guerra / Michigan Radio

Charter schools are public schools, which means they’re supposed to educate any kid that walks in the door.

But a new bill making its way through the Michigan legislature could make it so that charters can give enrollment preference to certain students.

Which ones? Well, the answer might surprise you. 

kid and school bus
Isabelle Acatauassu Alves Almeida / Flickr CC / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

My husband and I will be sending our youngest daughter off to kindergarten this fall. I must admit, I'm nervous, but she turns five in July and we feel like she's ready for a structured learning environment.

African-American student and teacher
U.S. Department of Education / Flickr CC / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Who did you most admire when you were a kid? Maybe it was your parent. Or a teacher. Or your favorite TV or movie star.

Role models, both positive and negative, help shape how children behave in school, relationships, and when making decisions.

Antonio Thomas and Julieaunna Clark are students at Muskegon Heights Academy high school
Lindsey Smith / Michigan Radio

Students in Muskegon Heights are very familiar with uncertainty. They’ve been threatened with school closure many times over the past several years—first because of finances, now because of failing test scores. 

Muskegon Heights Academy high school is one of the 38 schools the state School Reform Office says could close by the end of year if some kind of turnaround plan isn’t put in place.

kid holding lunch tray
Tim Lauer / Flickr CC / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

Children who experience hunger may lag developmentally behind their peers starting as early as kindergarten. That's according to a new study published in the journal Child Development.

Study authors suggest that dealing with hunger in the first five years of life can hurt school performance not only in kindergarten, but for years to come.

Google sign
:D / Flickr CC / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

The tech industry has a diversity problem.

In 2014, Hispanics made up only 4.4% of the professional-level workforce at the headquarters and local branches of the top 75 Silicon Valley tech firms, according to the Center for American Progress. And blacks made up just 1.9% of these firms.

Google recently released its workplace diversity data, which revealed black employees represent only 2% of the company's workforce, according to NPR. And although the company admits to falling short of its diversity goal, it's taking a step toward changing that with a new campus called Howard University West.

U.S. Supreme Court
Phil Roeder / Flickr CC / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Earlier this week, in an 8-0 decision, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in favor of bolstering the rights of millions of students with learning disabilities.

The decisions requires public schools to offer special education programs that meet higher standards.

Taking a look at the days following, here are five stories about the Supreme Court's ruling you should read to get caught up.

School Lunch
DC Central Kitchen / Flickr CC / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

Education leaders and policy makers have attempted to improve standardized test scores with strategies like longer school days and smaller class sizes.

But there could be a simpler and more cost-effective solution: school lunches.

classroom desks
alamosbasement / Flickr CC / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

Got some free time this weekend? Check out these 5 education stories you may have missed this week:

1. Applying for college aid just got harder NPR

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