Justice

Justice
8:00 am
Wed June 4, 2014

A Detroit diversion program gives teen offenders a second chance at a clean record

In Teen Court, a jury of high school students asks questions of the offender to come up with an appropriate sentence.
Credit Jennifer Guerra / Michigan Radio

This is a story about second chances.

When a teen commits a crime it goes on their permanent record, which can lead to all kinds of disadvantages down the road. When they go to apply for a job, for example, they’ll have to admit they broke the law. But a diversion program out of Wayne County gives some low-level, first-time offenders a way to admit their guilt and keep their record clean at the same time. 

Let’s meet the defendant

Chloe (not her real name) was with her friend at J.C. Penney. Her friend stole a bunch of stuff while they were there; Chloe stole a $30 bracelet. They both got caught before they could run out of the store.

Since shoplifting is a misdemeanor and because this is Chloe’s first ever run-in with the law, she’s decided to take her case to Teen Court. This particular teen court is affiliated with the Detroit Public School district. But there are dozens of teen courts around the state and more than 1,000 across the country.

In order for teen court to work, the defendant has to admit up front that she broke the law. Then it’s up to a group of high school students – a literal jury of her peers – to come up with an appropriate sentence.

"Hopefully they teach me something and hopefully they learn from my mistakes and stuff" says Chloe. "And I hope I leave there feeling relieved that I finally got to talk about it."

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Justice
2:52 pm
Tue June 3, 2014

State Supreme Court changes child welfare practice, says "one-parent" rule unconstitutional

Credit Matt Katzenberger / flickr

The Michigan Supreme Court has ruled a practice by the state's child welfare system is unconstitutional. 

Yesterday the State Supreme Court struck down a 12-year-old rule they said violated the constitution because it allowed the state to punish both parents for abuse or neglect of a child for whom only one parent was responsible, even when parents were not living together.

A person's right to raise their child without interference from the state – their "parental rights –" is constitutionally protected.

"Before, the state could put a child in foster care for what just one parent did," says Vivek Sankaran, who argued the case against the state. "Now the state has to make findings against both parents before it can take a child away and put them in foster care."

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Justice
6:55 pm
Tue March 25, 2014

Michigan's same-sex marriage case analysis – parenting edition

The plaintiffs in Michigan's same-sex marriage case with their children.
Credit Lester Graham

Update 9:06 p.m.

The appeals court ruled this evening the ban will continue to be in place while the case makes its way through the courts.  

Original post 6:40 p.m.

A decision is expected as soon as tomorrow on what exactly is happening with Michigan's same-sex marriage ban.

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Justice
2:09 pm
Mon February 24, 2014

One reason Michigan's same-sex marriage case could be a bigger deal than you think

Credit Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

Tomorrow, a federal court will hear arguments in the Michigan case, DeBoer v. Snyder. The case challenges the constitutionality of the state's ban on same-sex marriage, and the ability of same-sex couples to adopt children together. 

No matter how it turns out, the case for and against gay marriage will probably run along a well-trodden path.

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Justice
12:22 pm
Thu February 6, 2014

Michigan out of step with other states on "Juvenile lifers"

Credit Mindsey Mohan / flickr

The Michigan Senate will vote on Senate Bill 319 any day now.

Under the bill, which is expected to pass, about 350 juveniles sentenced to mandatory life without parole will not have a chance at parole.

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Justice
12:08 pm
Tue January 21, 2014

How much time is enough for juveniles serving life in Michigan?

Credit mattaz / flickr

In 2012, the US Supreme Court ruled that mandatory life sentences for juveniles are unconstitutional.  That doesn't mean it's impossible for a young offender to get a life sentence, it's just not automatic.

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Justice
8:40 am
Wed October 30, 2013

Students try to break the schools-to-prisons pipeline

Rasul Zakie, Chanel Kithen and Trevon Stapleton of Youth Voice, lead a workshop on the “school-to-prison pipeline”
Credit Zak Rosen / Michigan Radio

The school-to-prison pipeline is a nationwide pattern of students being pushed out of schools and into the criminal justice system.

Groups like the ACLU argue young people, especially African Americans, are suspended and expelled from school at disproportionate rates, and research suggests that once they’re expelled, those students are more likely to end up in prison.

Now, a group of people most affected by the school-to-prison pipeline are working to end it.  


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9:41 am
Fri September 20, 2013

Giving Kalamazoo youth offenders one more chance

Lead in text: 
We hear about the need for "wrap around services" for small children, but what about young adults who just need one more chance? Our publishing partner, Southwest Michigan's Second Wave, has an article this week about a successful Kalamazoo-based youth diversion pilot project. Working in conjunction with the juvenile justice system, a local spoken word program, Kinetic Affect, is piloting a program that they hope will be replicated in other communities. As Kirk Latimer, one of the program's founders told Second Wave, "The judge isn’t ready to give up on them and neither are we."
In any given month, approximately 1,900 Kalamazoo County residents are on probation. About 25 percent of those people are ages 17 to 20. These uncomfortable numbers come from Lynn Kirkpatrick, probation services director in district court, and these numbers make no one more uncomfortable than Judge Anne Blatchford of the 8th District Court.
Justice
10:53 am
Tue September 10, 2013

Reuters investigation: Families giving adopted children away on the internet

Adopted children, largely from international adoptions, are being put into harm's way by adoptive parents often at their wits end. As Megan Towhey of Reuters finds, there are many internet-based forums where adoptive parents can advertise children they no longer want, and other people who want the children offer to take the children.

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Justice
12:07 pm
Thu June 27, 2013

How a Supreme Court decision affects Michigan Tribes

In the slew of recent Supreme Court decisions there are people feeling like winners (LGBT married couples perhaps) and losers (voting rights and workplace discrimination advocates among them). American Indian tribes also had a decision come down in Adoptive Couple v. Baby Girl that could profoundly affect Indian children and families.  

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