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African-American student and teacher
U.S. Department of Education / Flickr CC / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Who did you most admire when you were a kid? Maybe it was your parent. Or a teacher. Or your favorite TV or movie star.

Role models, both positive and negative, help shape how children behave in school, relationships, and when making decisions.

graduation cap
Amanda Mar / Flickr / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

President Donald Trump signed an executive order Tuesday moving the Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities from the Department of Education to the executive office of the White House - a move aimed at possibly sending more funding to HBCUs in the future.

flickr.com/hckyso

Education is one of the best ways to get ahead in America. So, why do so many young people from poor backgrounds drop out? An economic paper published this month by the Brookings Institution suggests one possible answer, and it has nothing to do with grades or test scores. Maybe, for kids who grow up poor, with evidence of inequality all around them, dropping out of school just seems like the rational choice. 

It should be the opposite. Most economists would say, kids who start out at the bottom of the economic heap should have the incentive to get as much education as possible. Many economists believe the problem really comes down to skills. Young people trying to climb up out of poverty want to be highly educated, the thinking goes. They just don't get the right skills and training along the way. In this model, the education system itself is where the problem occurs, and that's where the fix is needed.

But the new Brookings paper by economists Melissa Kearney and Philip Levine (who we previously mentioned here) suggests the problem lies elsewhere.

Andrea Claire Maio

  

It’s high school graduation season, and there’s lots to celebrate. Michigan’s four-year graduation rate is 79%, the highest it’s been in years.

But for students of color and students from low-income families, the rate is significantly lower. To bring those numbers up, some schools let students at risk of failing “recover” credits to stay on track for graduation. But are those methods as rigorous as they should be?


Michelle / flickr

Infowire fills the information gap and meets the news needs of families struggling to make ends meet. Get all Infowire alerts by texting INFOWIRE to 734-954-4539 or email infowire@michiganradio.org

"Everybody who goes to alternative gets the label," says Zachary. "Automatically."

The label, he explains, is that of "the bad kids in town." Zachary is 16 and a student at the alternative high school in Stockbridge. He says everyone in his small town just grows up thinking "alternative kids" are somehow more trouble than their traditional school counterparts. 

Our friends over at MLive.com have a story out today about what some Michigan colleges are doing to improve graduations rates for black men. Along with the story, they've published a searchable database so you can check graduation rates at any Michigan college, break the rate down by race and then compare the results over time. It's a useful tool.