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Stateside

students on stage
April Van Buren / Michigan Radio

Education in America remains deeply segregated.

But at the same time, there are more students of color than ever before. In 2014, for the first time, minority students made up over 50% of public school enrollment.

One district that’s seen those shifting demographics first-hand is Plymouth-Canton Community Schools.

And it's been intentional about creating an environment where students and families from all backgrounds feel welcome.

a community garden
April Van Buren / Michigan Radio

On the corner of South Washington and Garden Street in Lansing, you'll find a brown sign with the words "Welcome to Fabulous Acres Neighborhood" painted in bright yellow letters.

The community is just south of where the Diamond Reo plant once turned out its cars and trucks. By January of 1980, the plant had been torn down.

But Fabulous Acres lives on.

Sarah Hulett / Michigan Radio

When a neighborhood's got a problem, sometimes all it takes is a few people coming up with solutions over drinks.

About a year and a half ago, a group of Hamtramck neighbors decided they were fed up with the horrible road conditions in their town.

They got together, bought some cold patch and started filling potholes.

Morgan Springer / Interlochen Public Radio

Neighbors helping neighbors. That’s the motto of ShareCare of Leelanau County.

Since 1994, ShareCare has been helping seniors stay in their homes. It’s truly a win-win proposition.

Seniors in Leelanau get the support and help they need to live independently, at home. And volunteers get the reward of knowing they’re helping their neighbors.

A teacher's take on the future of Detroit schools

Jun 16, 2016
spirit of detroit statue wearing a detroit public schools t-shirt
FLICKR USER MICHIGAN MUNICIPAL LEAGUE (MML) / FLICKR / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

When Detroit Public Schools opens its doors this fall, it will likely be debt-free.

The Michigan Legislature earlier this month sent a bill to Governor Snyder which gives the district $617 million to pay off its substantial debt. 

It also shifts control back to an elected school board and splits the district into two distinct entities. Detroit Public Schools will pay off the debt. The new district, Detroit Community Schools, will be in charge of educating students. 

So, what do the people who will be doing the educating think about the state's bailout plan?