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Health

Health

police car
Scott Davidson / Flickr CC / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

About 15 million children in the United States–21% of all kids–live in impoverished families. These kids are at higher risk for negative health outcomes like low birth weight, asthma, obesity and mental health problems.

Growing up poor is also a well-known risk factor for child abuse and neglect. And a recent study suggests that children in poor families also have a higher chance of dying from abuse.

Graphic of a brain
A Health Blog / Flickr CC / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

Our experiences shape who we are.

Here at State of Opportunity, we've talked extensively about how Adverse Childhood Experiences—or ACEs—can affect a child throughout their lives. But new research suggests traumatic experiences in adulthood can be just as harmful.

Baby sitting in box
Donnie Ray Jones / Flickr CC / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

Last year I told you about babies in Finland sleeping in boxes. It's a program Finland's government started in 1938 that provides all expectant moms with a maternity box filled with clothes, bedding, and baby products and accessories, along with a mattress to go in the bottom of the box to create a safe first bed for baby to sleep in.

.sarahwynne. / flickr http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Do you remember what it was like being a teenager? You had to deal with hormone and body changes. It felt like no one understood you and you may have had trouble understanding your own feelings.

Being a teenager can be tough. But it can be even harder when a child is dealing with depression.

Cody / Flickr CC / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

The number of kids with peanut allergy tripled between 1997 and 2008, according to Food Allergy Research and Education (FARE).

The idea that your child could be exposed to nuts and have a reaction that is damaging, or even fatal, can be pretty scary. In the past, caregivers were told to avoid exposing kids in danger of developing an allergy to peanut products for the first few years of their lives.

Best Buddies Delaware / Flickr CC / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

I am a mother of two young girls. And I am fully aware that one day I will have to have "the talk" with each of them about puberty and the things that come with it. While I can't exactly say I'm excited about it, I want to make sure they are equipped to cope with the transition.

Unfortunately, that's not always the case. Many girls – particularly those from low-income families – feel unprepared for puberty, according to a new study published in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

Donnie Ray Jones / Flickr CC / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Childhood obesity rates for children and adolescents in the U.S. ages 2 to 10 have remained at about 17% over the past decade. But here's a bit of good news: The number of overweight toddlers in the U.S. seems to be going down.

That's according to a recent study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Baby yawning
Jill M / Flickr CC / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

The holidays are here, and many of you will be heading out of town this weekend to visit family or loved ones. 

If you're traveling with a baby, we want to remind you to plan ahead so that your child has a safe space to sleep. As you're packing up the presents and holiday cookies, make sure you're also bringing a portable crib like a pack and play or a bassinet. 

A pea on a plate. With a fork and knife.
Steven Tyrie / Flickr CC / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

The National School Lunch Program helps keep low-income kids from going hungry while they're in school. Over 21 million K-12 students in the U.S. received free and reduced-priced school lunches during the 2014-2015 school year.

But what happens to these same kids when they go off to college?

A recent study found nearly half of college students across the country are food insecure. That means they struggle just to get enough affordable, nutritious food.

Ron Cruz / Flickr CC / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Cigarette smoking is the leading preventable cause of death in the U.S. It harms nearly every organ in the body and is linked to health conditions like cancer, heart disease and stroke, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

And when a mother chooses to smoke during pregnancy, she is harming not only her health, but the health of her baby.

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