Health

Health

What determines how long we live? Is it our lifestyle choices?

What we eat. Whether we exercise. If we go to the doctor regularly. Whether we smoke or use drugs.

Four ways cities across the U.S. are fighting hunger

May 16, 2016
Girl eating peach
Bruce Tuten / Flickr CC / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

How close do you live to the nearest grocery store? I live within ten minutes of at least three chain grocery stores: Kroger, Meijer and Walmart. But places to buy quality, affordable food are not easily accessed by everyone.

Swaddled baby
Scott Granneman / Flickr CC / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

Swaddling – the practice of snugly wrapping an infant with a light cloth, with only the head exposed – mimics the warm, cozy environment of the mother's womb. It's reported to promote better sleep for babies.

But a new study in the journal Pediatrics links the practice to an increased risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).

Toddler blowing bubbles
AnneCN / Flickr CC / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

In 2007, the American Academy of Pediatrics pushed for all kids to be screened for Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) at their 18- and 24-month well child visit.

And according to a study released last week, ”Age of Diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder in an Ethnically Diverse Population Before and after the 2007 AAP Recommendation for Universal Screening,” kids with autism are now being diagnosed earlier, making it possible for them to be treated sooner.

Teen birth rates per 1,000 females aged 15-19
The Washington Post (Data from the CDC)

The number of teens having babies in the U.S. is at an all-time low.

Births to all teens have gone down more than 40 percent over the past decade, according to a new analysis by the Centers for Disease Control.

The rate hit a critical peak in 1991, at 61.8 births for every 1,000 adolescent females. In 2014, there were 24.2 births per 1,000 – the lowest rate ever recorded.

So what is driving this shift?

Taryn / Flickr Creative Commons / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

UPDATED: 4/26/16 at 2:37 pm

Inconsolable crying. Difficulty feeding. Tremors. Tight muscle tone. Fever. Diarrhea.

These are among the miseries a newborn with Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS) may experience.

NAS describes the withdrawal process newborns endure after being exposed in the womb to opioids, like heroin, morphine, and oxycodone.

Steven Leith / Flickr Creative Commons / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

I heard a story this morning on NPR that was pretty concerning.

Boggs School

Health care is expensive.

Even with insurance, I've paid $25 co-pays to my kids' doctor only to have them out in 10 minutes and diagnosed with "a fever."

But having insurance means I can take them to get medical treatment for a lot less than if I didn't have insurance at all.

Donnie Ray Jones / Flickr Creative Commons / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

When I saw a headline about babies sleeping in boxes today as I was scrolling through the news on my phone, I thought it was a joke.

But it turns out it really is a thing.

Since 1938, Finland's government has provided all expectant moms, regardless of economic status, with a maternity box filled with clothes, bedding, and products used in the first few months of a baby's life.

Sheena876 / Flickr Creative Commons / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

Earlier this week, Dustin Dwyer brought us Brianna Darin's first-hand account of conquering depression.

The high schooler shared the steps she took after it clicked for her that she needed help.

But for some, the stigma surrounding mental illness can keep them from seeking the help they may need to achieve mental health.

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