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education

report card for school
Michigan Department of Education

There’s a new blueprint for the future of school accountability in Michigan.  

The state’s Department of Education on Tuesday unveiled its draft plan for the implementation of the federal Every Student Succeeds Act (or ESSA). 

Classroom
Allison Meier / Flickr CC / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

From a new U.S. education secretary to conversations about school closures, it has been a busy week in education news. As we head into the weekend, let's take a look at some stories you may have missed.

1. Betsy DeVos Confirmed As Education Secretary

Betsy Devos was confirmed as U.S. Education Secretary on Feb. 7, 2017.
BetsyDeVos.com

Michigan's own Betsy DeVos is now the most powerful education official in the nation. So what does that mean for Michigan? Let's start our story in Detroit, where DeVos played a big role in pushing for more school choice in the district.

Students from Fordson High School in Dearborn (above) and students from Hamilton High School near Holland.
Courtesy of Zeinab Chami and Lauren Robinson

As neighborhoods and thus schools become more segregated, there are teachers who have decided to confront that head-on. They're not waiting for a grand solution from our leaders to appear.

They know it's easy to get along with people who look like you, and think like you, but they want to prepare their students for a world that is increasingly diverse.

students on stage
April Van Buren / Michigan Radio

Education in America remains deeply segregated.

But at the same time, there are more students of color than ever before. In 2014, for the first time, minority students made up over 50% of public school enrollment.

One district that’s seen those shifting demographics first-hand is Plymouth-Canton Community Schools.

And it's been intentional about creating an environment where students and families from all backgrounds feel welcome.

Young boy doing homework
Eric Cuthbert / Flickr CC / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

It seemed like skipping students ahead a grade level or putting them in split-grade classes were common strategies to keep advanced students engaged when I was in elementary school.

Classroom
Allison Meier / Flickr CC / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

Today is Inauguration Day and President Donald Trump has been sworn in as the 45th President of the United States.

As Barack Obama leaves office, we're taking a look back at the changes to public education in the U.S. during his tenure and looking ahead to what the future of education might look like under the new administration. Here's what we've been reading. 

three kids using a laptop
Lucélia Ribeiro / Flickr CC / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

America needs teachers. The country is facing its first major teacher shortage since the 1990s, according to The Washington Post.

Jennifer Guerra / Michigan Radio

How many kids are in a typical classroom in Michigan?

That’s a tough question to answer. And believe me, we’ve tried

But a new report from the Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy at the University of Michigan gives a clearer picture of class sizes in Michigan’s public schools.

Jozef Jason, 7, reads to his barber
Jennifer Guerra / Michigan Radio

Most kids will head back to school this week ready to learn. But some will have to spend a good chunk of time re-learning things they forgot over the summer. The dreaded “summer slide” has been linked to persistent achievement gaps between kids from lower-income families and their better-off peers.

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