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child poverty

kids on merry-go-round
guilherme jofili / Flickr CC / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

More than one in five children in the U.S. lives in poverty. That's nearly 16 million kids.

And nearly twice as many experience poverty at some point during childhood.

Research shows poverty is the greatest threat to a child's well-being, and childhood poverty can have lifelong consequences.

New Mexico: A tale of tourism and severe child poverty

Apr 4, 2016
Nicholas A. Tonelli / Flickr Creative Commons / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

Vast white sand dunes.

Clear blue skies.

Dramatic landscapes.

And the highest rate of child poverty in the nation?

New Mexico's tourism campaign, "New Mexico True," promises "adventure that feeds the soul."

In a series of videos similar to our state's "Pure Michigan" campaign, you can see footage of ski slopes, cultural sites, and fun family activities:

Report: Time to beef up the federal child tax credit

Aug 18, 2015
Erica Szlosek / Wikimedia Commons-https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/legalcode

Strengthening the child tax credit would help level the playing field for families, particularly communities of color.

That is one key finding according to new report by the Center for American Progress:

Nate Grigg / Flickr Creative Commons

When it comes to opportunity, growing up in poverty stacks the deck against kids almost more than anything else. 

The Annie E. Casey Foundation’s nationwide survey of child well-being, KidsCount's, is out today. Michigan ranks 33rd overall in the measures of economic stability, family and community, health, and education for kids. This is the second year in a row that Michigan has fallen behind, and when you dig into the numbers, it gets worse.

Is the "culture of poverty" real, or a myth?

Mar 24, 2015
Brian Paris / flickr

When I was in eighth grade my social studies teacher explained to my class the difference between Democrats and Republicans.

This lesson in American politics is my only specific memory of anything I "learned" in any class that year. For example, I'm sure I learned things in honors biology. But in my memory I see nothing except  for a kid doing push-ups in front of the class because he swore. 

Five takeaways from our reporting on poverty

Mar 20, 2015
Brendan Riley / Flickr

In America, we say we believe every child should have the opportunity to succeed, no matter where they live or how much money is in their parents' bank account. 

But not all kids have access to opportunity, and low-income families are repeatedly at a disadvantage.

State of Opportunity has devoted close to three years investigating the barriers low-income kids face in trying to get ahead in Michigan.

We think it's time for a look back at what we’ve learned so far.

Eva Petoskey

Suicide is a major public health problem for American Indians. The suicide rate for American Indian teenagers in particular is 2.5 times higher than the national average. I took a trip over the summer to the Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians Reservation in Suttons Bay to talk with folks in the community about the issue.

When I visited the reservation, it was rainy, no sun in sight, but that didn't stop a couple thousand people from making the trek to the reservation for the annual powwow. The Anishinaabe word is "Jiingtamok." 

When kids bring trauma to school with them

Nov 20, 2014
Krissy Venosdale / Flickr

There’s a reason we talk about trauma so much at State of Opportunity: It has a huge impact on kids.

When we say “trauma," we’re referring to a child’s emotional response to an absolutely terrible event, like witnessing violence or living with an alcoholic parent – two examples of traumatic experiences described in the Adverse Childhood Experiences Study (and ACES test) we reported on earlier this year.

Dustin Dwyer

We're coming up on October and you'll be forgiven if not only autumn, but State of Opportunity content, has been flying past you.

That's what we're here for. 

Michigan child care options pushing low-income families out

Sep 25, 2014
Michigan League of Public Policy

Child care is an absolute necessity for working families -- and their employers. Nearly two-thirds of preschool age children in the U.S. live in homes where both caregivers work. So healthy and reasonably priced child care is essential for parents. 

What happens when affordable, high-quality child care isn't an option?

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