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Paulette Parker

Digital Journalist - Blogger

Paulette is a blogger for Michigan Radio's State of Opportunity project, which looks at kids from low-income families and what it takes to get them ahead. She previously interned as a reporter in the Michigan Radio newsroom.

Before working at Michigan Radio, she was the news editor of The Washtenaw Voice at Washtenaw Community College. She has an associate degree in journalism from WCC. And she is currently a junior at Eastern Michigan University, pursuing a bachelor's degree in media studies and journalism.

When she isn't working she is spending time with her husband and two young daughters.

Early Childhood Classroom
Charlie Vinz / Flickr CC / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

Latino students are, on average, approximately three months behind their white peers in math when they start kindergarten, according to a recent report from the Child Trends Hispanic Institute.

For the report, "Making Math Count More for Young Latino Children," researchers reviewed existing research and analyzed data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study.

boy doing homework
PacificLegalFoundation / Flickr CC / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

There are more than 1.3 million homeless students in the United States - a number that has nearly doubled in the last decade.

Stack of money
Pictures of Money / Flickr CC / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

State funding for higher education in the U.S. is showing continued growth overall. That's according to the results of the latest Grapevine survey, an annual compilation of data on state fiscal support for higher education.

State funding rose by 3.4% across the U.S. from the 2015-16 to 2016-17 fiscal years. James Palmer is a professor of higher education at Illinois State University and Grapevine Editor.

.sarahwynne. / flickr http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Do you remember what it was like being a teenager? You had to deal with hormone and body changes. It felt like no one understood you and you may have had trouble understanding your own feelings.

Being a teenager can be tough. But it can be even harder when a child is dealing with depression.

Classroom
Allison Meier / Flickr CC / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

From a new U.S. education secretary to conversations about school closures, it has been a busy week in education news. As we head into the weekend, let's take a look at some stories you may have missed.

1. Betsy DeVos Confirmed As Education Secretary

Person typing on laptop
Ministerio TIC Colombia / Flickr CC / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

The Federal Communications Commission is telling nine network service providers they won't be able to participate in a federal program designed to provide internet services to low-income consumers - at least for now.

Girl eating peach
Bruce Tuten / Flickr CC / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

If you follow State of Opportunity regularly, then you know we've talked quite a bit about food deserts – places where fresh fruits and vegetables are in short supply.

baby laying down reading
Donnie Ray Jones / Flickr CC / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

As the week winds down, many of us are looking forward to a little rest and relaxation. I thought I'd share some recommended reading – and listening – for you to check out if you have some free time this weekend:

1. How Segregated Schools Built Segregated Cities

Kid hanging upside down at playground
Virginia State Parks / Flickr CC / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

The benefits and necessity of school recess have been widely debated over the past decade. But growing research shows recess helps improve academic achievement, prevents bullying, and develops emotional and communication skills.

For example, a 2009 study of more than 10,000 American kids found improved behavior when they got at least one recess period of 15 minutes or longer.

But how should effective recess be structured? How long should it be? What should children do during that time? There seems to be little guidance on what makes "good" recess.

Young boy doing homework
Eric Cuthbert / Flickr CC / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

It seemed like skipping students ahead a grade level or putting them in split-grade classes were common strategies to keep advanced students engaged when I was in elementary school.

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