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Paulette Parker

Digital Journalist - Blogger

Paulette is a blogger for Michigan Radio's State of Opportunity project, which looks at kids from low-income families and what it takes to get them ahead. She previously interned as a reporter in the Michigan Radio newsroom.

Before working at Michigan Radio, she was the news editor of The Washtenaw Voice at Washtenaw Community College. She has an associate degree in journalism from WCC. And she is currently a junior at Eastern Michigan University, pursuing a bachelor's degree in media studies and journalism.

When she isn't working she is spending time with her husband and two young daughters.

Google sign
:D / Flickr CC / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

The tech industry has a diversity problem.

In 2014, Hispanics made up only 4.4% of the professional-level workforce at the headquarters and local branches of the top 75 Silicon Valley tech firms, according to the Center for American Progress. And blacks made up just 1.9% of these firms.

Google recently released its workplace diversity data, which revealed black employees represent only 2% of the company's workforce, according to NPR. And although the company admits to falling short of its diversity goal, it's taking a step toward changing that with a new campus called Howard University West.

Baby sitting in box
Donnie Ray Jones / Flickr CC / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

Last year I told you about babies in Finland sleeping in boxes. It's a program Finland's government started in 1938 that provides all expectant moms with a maternity box filled with clothes, bedding, and baby products and accessories, along with a mattress to go in the bottom of the box to create a safe first bed for baby to sleep in.

U.S. Supreme Court
Phil Roeder / Flickr CC / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Earlier this week, in an 8-0 decision, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in favor of bolstering the rights of millions of students with learning disabilities.

The decisions requires public schools to offer special education programs that meet higher standards.

Taking a look at the days following, here are five stories about the Supreme Court's ruling you should read to get caught up.

School Lunch
DC Central Kitchen / Flickr CC / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

Education leaders and policy makers have attempted to improve standardized test scores with strategies like longer school days and smaller class sizes.

But there could be a simpler and more cost-effective solution: school lunches.

classroom desks
alamosbasement / Flickr CC / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

Got some free time this weekend? Check out these 5 education stories you may have missed this week:

1. Applying for college aid just got harder NPR

neighborhood
symmetry_mind / Flickr CC / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

Neighborhoods. It's a topic that has come up time and time again here at State of Opportunity. That's because where people live has a lot to do with who they become.

newspaper stand
User Yukiko Matsuoka / Flickr CC / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

The American Academy of Pediatrics issued a statement in January on protecting immigrant children following president Trump's immigration-focused Executive Orders.

The statement highlighted the effects that these crackdowns can have on kids, including fear and toxic stress. Those can harm the developing brain and negatively impact both short- and long-term health.

Immigration and refugee policy are pretty complicated topics, and it can be easy to forget about the kids who are in the middle of that political debate. Here's a look back at some recent stories about how that debate is affecting young people here in America and across the world. 

woman working on a computer
X Y / Flickr CC / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Wednesday was International Women's Day. It was also "A Day Without a Woman," a protest encouraging participants to skip work or school and avoid spending money to highlight the significant role women play in society.

The global day of protest aimed to accelerate gender parity – especially when it comes to the persistent gender wage gap.

TED Talk stage
Steve Jurvetson / Flickr CC / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

More than 45 million Americans – nearly 16 million of them children – live below the poverty line.

And poverty isn't just a U.S. issue. It's a global problem, affecting nearly half of the world's population, according to DoSomething.org.

person holding phone
CAFNR / Flickr CC / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Research shows when parents are involved and engaged in their kids' education, it improves student achievement. Students earn higher grades and test scores, show improved behavior and miss fewer school days.

But with both kids and parents having increasingly busy lives, getting involved can be easier said than done

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