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A young immigrant in Michigan: "The hope is still there, but fear is really intense."

Thousands of young immigrants in Michigan today are living in a state of limbo.

During the presidential campaign, Donald Trump vowed to end the Obama administration's deferred action program that allowed these young immigrants to go to school, and work, without fear of deportation.

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Baby yawning
Jill M / Flickr CC / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

The holidays are here, and many of you will be heading out of town this weekend to visit family or loved ones. 

If you're traveling with a baby, we want to remind you to plan ahead so that your child has a safe space to sleep. As you're packing up the presents and holiday cookies, make sure you're also bringing a portable crib like a pack and play or a bassinet. 

The fear is real. But we can overcome it by how we live our lives.

Dec 21, 2016
arthurjohnpicton on flickr, CC by-NC 2.0

My name is Alvin Thomas. I’m the pastor of The Nations Church in Utica, Michigan.

My parents, my mom and dad, were born in south India. I was born in New York City, so I feel American.

But, as my skin color will tell you, I’m Indian.

Woman with babies.
Donnie Ray Jones / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

More moms in the U.S. are the primary breadwinners for their households than ever before - earning as much as or more than their husbands. That's according to a new report from the Center for American Progress.

young girl playing in the snow
Clintus / Flickr CC / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

When the school bell rings on Friday afternoon, most students in the U.S. will be headed home for two glorious weeks of winter break.

But as that time off is around the holidays, the long break can also be a recipe for restless children and parents at their wits' end. 

To help parents stay sane into the new year and avoid hearing "I'm bored" for two weeks straight, we compiled some ideas for winter break activities to do as a family. 

school bus covered in snow
ThoseGuys119 / Flickr CC / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Most of us here in Michigan started our week digging out from the first widespread snowstorm of the season. And many kids across the state enjoyed their first snow day of the school year.

For some families, a snow day means an extra day of rest. But unexpected days off aren't always a cause for celebration for low-income families, whose resources are already stretched. 

Dr. Seuss Books
EvelynGiggles / Flickr CC / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Earlier this week I told you about school districts that are hiring virtual teachers to fix teacher shortages.

Not having enough teachers to fill classrooms can have a big impact on schools and the students who attend them - especially high-poverty and high-minority schools.

flickr user Shiyang Huang

I met Jamie Rykse a couple months ago, to talk about juvenile justice reform in Michigan. When she was 17, she was convicted of home invasion and sent to serve four years in adult prison.

This week, I met up with her again to talk about what happened after she got out of prison, how she started helping out at Heartside Ministry, a place she’d gotten help when she was homeless.

A pea on a plate. With a fork and knife.
Steven Tyrie / Flickr CC / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

The National School Lunch Program helps keep low-income kids from going hungry while they're in school. Over 21 million K-12 students in the U.S. received free and reduced-priced school lunches during the 2014-2015 school year.

But what happens to these same kids when they go off to college?

A recent study found nearly half of college students across the country are food insecure. That means they struggle just to get enough affordable, nutritious food.

three kids using a laptop
Lucélia Ribeiro / Flickr CC / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

America needs teachers. The country is facing its first major teacher shortage since the 1990s, according to The Washington Post.

people in graduation caps and gowns
Will Folsom / Flickr CC / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Nationwide, each school guidance counselor is responsible, on average, for about 500 students. Their job includes providing students with academic skills support and helping with goal setting and academic and career plans.

And the help students receive can have a major impact on their lives even after high school graduation, according to a recent analysis by the National Association for College Admission Counseling. Researchers analyzed data from a longitudinal study that follows 23,000 students who started 9th grade in 2009.

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